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Dr. Nathaniel Revis

Bioavailability of Cadmium

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1984
Nathaniel W. Revis, “Bioavailability of Cadmium and its Human Consequence”, Technical Report DOE, DOE/ER/60094-T2, 1984

Bioavailability of Cadmium and its Human Consequence

N. W. Revis

Oak Ridge Research Inst., TN (USA). Research and Development Dept.

Subject
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; CADMIUM; TOXICITY; DATA COMPILATION; DIET; DISEASES; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; HUMAN POPULATIONS; INTESTINAL ABSORPTION; KIDNEYS; TOBACCO SMOKES; ABSORPTION; AEROSOLS; BODY; COLLOIDS; DATA; DISPERSIONS; ELEMENTS; INFORMATION; METALS; NUMERICAL DATA; ORGANS; POPULATIONS; RESIDUES; SMOKES; SOLS; UPTAKE
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Dietary Protein Effects

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1984
Nathaniel W. Revis and Tanya R. Osborne, “Dietary Protein Effects on Cadmium and Metallothionein Accumulation in the Liver and Kidney of Rats”, Environmental Health Perspectives, Volume 54, Pages 83–91, 1984


Dietary Protein Effects on Cadmium and Metallothionein Accumulation in the Liver and Kidney of Rats

by Nathaniel W. Revis* and Tanya R. Osborne*

The relationship of dietary protein to cadmium absorption and tissue deposition was studied in male Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to different levels of cadmium in the drinking water. In animals fed a high-protein or low-protein diet and drinking water containing 25 or 50 ppm cadmium, liver and kidney cadmium and metaliothionein were both significantly higher in rats fed the high-protein diet for 2 to 4 months. These differences may possibly be explained by the concentration of cysteine observed between these two diets.
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Effectiveness of Chemical Carinogens

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1984
Nathaniel W. Revis, R. Bull, D. Laurie and C. A. Schiller, “The Effectiveness of Chemical Carinogens to Induce Atherosclerosis in the White Carneau Pigeon”, Toxicology, Volume 32, Issue 3, Pages 215-227, 1984


The Effectiveness of Chemical Carinogens to Induce Atherosclerosis in the White Carneau Pigeon


NW Revis, R Bull, D Laurie, CA Schiller

Abstract

The frequency of atherosclerotic lesions of the abdominal aorta has been reported to increase significantly in chickens exposed to benzo[a]pyrene and 7,12-dimethylbenz[a,h]anthracene. The present studies were performed to determine in another experimental model frequently used in atherosclerotic studies (i.e. White Carneau Pigeons) whether these and other chemical carcinogens enhance atherosclerosis.
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Bioavailability of Cadmium and its Human Consequence

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1984
Bibliographic Citation
     
Document 
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Title Bioavailability of Cadmium and its Human Consequence
Creator/Author Revis, N. W.
Publication Date 1984 Jan 01
OSTI Identifier OSTI ID: 6748022; Legacy ID: DE84014378
Report Number(s) DOE/ER/60094-T2
DOE Contract Number AC05-82ER60094
Other Number(s) Other: ON: DE84014378
Resource Type
Technical Report
Resource Relation Other Information: Paper copy only, copy does not permit microfiche production
Research Org Oak Ridge Research Inst., TN (USA). Research and Development Dept.
Subject 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; CADMIUM; TOXICITY; DATA COMPILATION; DIET; DISEASES; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; HUMAN POPULATIONS; INTESTINAL ABSORPTION; KIDNEYS; TOBACCO SMOKES; ABSORPTION; AEROSOLS; BODY; COLLOIDS; DATA; DISPERSIONS; ELEMENTS; INFORMATION; METALS; NUMERICAL DATA; ORGANS; POPULATIONS; RESIDUES; SMOKES; SOLS; UPTAKE
Description/Abstract    Cadmium intake for the average adult in the USA from water, air and food is approximately 43 ..mu..g/day. This value does not include intake from cigarette smoking or industrial exposure. Intake from these sources would add significantly the total Cd body burden because, Cd absorption via the respiratory track is approximately 10 times the value observed for the gastrointestinal tract. Renal tubular damage is the only human disease in which a dose-response has been established for Cd intake. For renal tubular damage an intake of 200 to 440 ..mu..g/day for 50 years would be necessary to induce this disease in 50% of the exposed population. Thus a safety margin of 10 exists between present intake levels and the amount required to induce renal tubular damage. If animal studies, which show the induction of hypertension following the long-term exposure to drinking water containing 100 ppB Cd, were related to present human intake values of 43 ..mu..g/day the safety margin level would be considerably lower than 10. In contrast, to relate the data from animal studies on cadmium-induced tumors to present human intake values suggest a safety margin greater than 10. 59 references, 4 tables.
Country of Publication
United States
Language English
Format Medium: X; Size: Pages: 21
Availability
NTIS, PC A02; 3.
System Entry Date 2008 Feb 08

 

Dietary Protein Effects on Cadmium and Metallothionein

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1984
Nathaniel W. Revis and Tanya R. Osborne, “Dietary Protein Effects on Cadmium and Metallothionein Accumulation in the Liver and Kidney of Rats”, Environmental Health Perspectives, Volume 54, Pages 83–91, 1984

Dietary Protein Effects on Cadmium and Metallothionein Accumulation in the Liver and Kidney of Rats

by Nathaniel W. Revis* and Tanya R. Osborne*

*Oak Ridge Research Institure, Oak Ridge, TN  37830

The relationship of dietary protein to cadmium absorption and tissue deposition was studied in male Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to different levels of cadmium in the drinking water. In animals fed a high-protein or low-protein diet and drinking water containing 25 or 50 ppm cadmium, liver and kidney cadmium and metaliothionein were both significantly higher in rats fed the high-protein diet for 2 to 4 months. These differences may possibly be explained by the concentration of cysteine observed between these two diets.
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